Why are some retailers only now realizing they have way too many stores?

Last month, Chico’s announced it plans to close 250 stores.

Recently, H&M decided to shutter 160 locations.

Last week, Charlotte Russe said it will close nearly 100.

Of course, this is hardly a new phenomenon. In recent years, dozens of chains have concluded that a meaningful percentage of their stores are suddenly superfluous. I’m not talking about the selective pruning of the real estate portfolio that retailers have been doing for ages as leases come up for renewal and/or evolving customer behavior warrants walking away from a handful of locations (or relocating them). What Nordstrom, Williams-Sonoma and others have done recently is far from alarming. What Sears and many others are engaged in typically speaks to abject leadership failure.

Absent the recent injection of new management, if a retailer’s leadership suddenly decides that 10% or more of its stores are no longer needed, we can be fairly certain of one thing: They have been asleep at the wheel. And why more boards and C-level executives are not taken to task (i.e. fired) for this is a complete mystery to me. Think about the following as you ponder brands that have taken an ax to their store fleets:

Was government legislation passed that suddenly made so many stores untenable?

Did a competitor emerge out of nowhere to crush the fundamentals of their business model?

What sea change in consumer behavior obviated the need for a strong physical presence in dozens of once-viable trade areas?

Far too often the harsh reality is that the underlying reason is management’s lack of awareness, an unwillingness to accept the new reality and a failure to act before a crisis emerges.

The majority of time the bullet that killed all these locations was fired years ago. The rapid growth in e-commerce, the impact of digital on driving store traffic, the blurring of shopping channels, the collapse of the middle, the bifurcation of shopping vs. buying, etc. have all been obvious for many years. So if management is only taking aggressive action now, we can be fairly certain that that they have not been paying enough attention for some time and were too cowardly to act. Perhaps Blockbuster or Borders can be given a bit of a pass for not seeing the rapid and disruptive impact of downloading streaming entertainment services on their core business models. But if you are in the apparel business and aren’t on top of what has been happening the last decade, there is simply no excuse. And boards and investors need to stop tolerating this nonsense.

In fact, there are plenty of examples of brick-and-mortar retailers that are successfully navigating the shift of power to the consumer and the impact of digital disruption. I wrote about them last week. These brands are seeing a renaissance because they realized they had a brand relevance problem, not a too many stores problem—and acted accordingly. They are winning because they saw their stores as assets, not liabilities. The notion that retailers can close massive number of outlets to create more profitable relevance is almost always a fool’s errand. I keep asking for examples of retailers that have done so successfully and the din of the crickets is growing distracting.

Time will tell if these brands will be able to shrink to prosperity. For everyone else it’s time for a gut check. It’s time to do the hard, uncomfortable work of going from boring to remarkable. It’s time to realize that, yes, the best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago and the second best time is today.

A version of this story appeared at Forbes, where I am a retail contributor. You can check out more of my posts and follow me here.  

On February 25th I will be doing the opening keynote at Retail ’19 in Melbourne, Australia, followed the next week by ShopTalk in Las Vegas where I will be moderating an expert panel and participating in other events.

The stores strike back

Amidst all the retail apocalypse nonsense it turns out that physical retail isn’t dead after all.  Last year some 3,000 new stores were opened and physical retail continued to have positive growth in most major global markets. One of my 14 predictions for retail in 2019 is the notion that, despite the presumed death of physical retail, quite a few major brands are seeing a renaissance of sorts. In fact, stores are striking back against being made obsolete by online shopping in many different and important ways.

Amidst all the retail apocalypse nonsense it turns out that physical retail isn’t dead after all.  Last year some 3,000 new stores were opened and physical retail continued to have positive growth in most major global markets. One of my 14 predictions for retail in 2019 is the notion that, despite the presumed death of physical retail, quite a few major brands are seeing a renaissance of sorts. In fact, stores are striking back against being made obsolete by online shopping in many different and important ways.

A couple of years ago legacy retailers like Walmart, Best Buy, Target and Home Depot were often seen as laggards, soon to be made progressively more irrelevant by Amazon and others. Yet it turns out, to paraphrase noted retail strategist Mark Twain, reports of their death were greatly exaggerated.

A couple of years ago, beyond Amazon’s disruptive impact, the future was often thought to be concentrated in the large number of venture capital funded “digitally-native vertical brands” that could scale to massive value creation by avoiding pesky and asset intensive stores.  Yet, in a rather ironic twist, a large cohort of the once firmly “we’ll only grow online because physical retail is going the way of the dinosaurs” upstarts will collectively open more than 800 brick-and-mortar locations this year. Most are now experiencing most of their growth from good old fashioned stores.

A couple of years ago, many analysts and “futurists” saw e-commerce getting to 50% share within a decade and questioned why anyone would invest in physical stores. But facts are stubborn things, and it’s clear we aren’t remotely on a glide-path to online getting to even 30%. Moreover, rather traditional retailers as diverse at TJX, Sephora, Ulta and Dollar General are openings dozens upon dozens of stores. We also have retailers like Tractor Supply and AtHome becoming large, growing and incredibly successful brands with an overwhelming focus on brick-and-mortar locations.

So how do we explain all this?

Not every customer is like you. You personally may love the ultra-convenience of e-commerce and hate going to stores. Good for you. But there is a reason 89% of all retail is still done in brick-and-mortar locations. Every retailer needs to respect the differences among consumers and their key purchasing drivers across different occasions. Repeat after me: treat different customers differently.

Brick and mortar trumps e-commerce in many respects. Shopping in physical stores is more emotional, social and connected. Shopping in physical stores allows customers to try stuff on, understand the real look of a given product and get a clearer sense of value. Shopping in physical stores offers immediate gratification. Shopping in physical stores makes it easier (usually) to put more complex solutions together, like a home project or assembling an outfit. It’s a digital-first world. Until it’s not.

E-commerce is often pretty unprofitable. It’s great that investors are willing to subsidize the poor profitability of many disruptive concepts, from Uber to WeWork to Amazon to Wayfair. It won’t last forever and many sophisticated companies are starting to lean into the lower cost acquisition and/or distribution costs of physical locations vs. direct-to-consumer. Accordingly their investment decisions and pricing are starting to reflect the underlying economic realities.

There is a big difference between buying and shopping. If you are on a largely search-based mission, item-focused and care mostly about price and convenience, e-commerce works really well.  Hence Amazon’s strong relative share in these “buying” occasions. You might even get all wild and crazy and use Alexa. But if you are more engaged in discovery, something more emotional and want a more holistic experience, then you are “shopping” and a physical store-centric (albeit digitally enabled) path is often your best bet.

Assets or liabilities? A brand that fundamentally sees their stores as liabilities typically seeks to optimize them–and a cycle of cost cutting and store closings begins, typically initiating a downward spiral.  If a brand see their stores as assets, they work on improving e-commerce and digital enablement capabilities and lean into making the stores more relevant. Contrast Sears strategy with Target’s. Sears disinvested in stores and will soon be gone. Target shifted many things about its store strategy and simultaneously upped its digital game, while plowing billions into store upgrades and omni-channel capabilities. So have Walmart, Home Depot and Best Buy. Nordstrom has continued its decade long strategy of doing so. It’s paying off.

It’s all one thing. Brands that are physical store dominant see their brick-and-mortar locations as the hub of a shopping ecosystem. They don’t get hung up on a phony battle between e-commerce and stores. The customer is the channel. Online drives stores and vice versa. Their mission is to leverage the best of each customer touchpoint, eliminate the friction, harmonize the experience and amplify the “wows.” Rinse and repeat.

Sure, there is plenty of doom and gloom in the retail industry. And the collapse of the boring middle is real–and not about to go away.

Yet there is plenty of hope as well for those that do the work, reimagine the opportunities and are willing to act decisively.

A version of this story appeared at Forbes, where I am a retail contributor. You can check out more of my posts and follow me here.  

On February 25th I will be doing the opening keynote at Retail ’19 in Melbourne, Australia, followed the next week by ShopTalk in Las Vegas where I will be moderating an expert panel and participating in other events.

Nordstrom: No good deeds go unpunished

Nordstrom–not only one of my favorite places to shop but also a brand I regularly feature in my keynotes on remarkable retail–recently reported strong quarterly operating performance and raised its outlook. So, naturally the stock promptly got whacked–and continues to be caught up in the market downdraft. To be sure, a non-recurring $72MM charge related to credit card billing errors does not inspire confidence. But unless this unexpected earnings hit suggests some underlying management issue it indicates nothing about the go-forward health of the business which, from where I sit, looks rather healthy.

It IS a confusing time for shares of most retailers. I’m not talking about JC Penney, Sears or legions of others hopelessly stuck in the boring middle. I’m referring to companies that are not only competitively well positioned but have also recently reported solid sales and earnings. Despite a strong consumer outlook, everyone from Amazon to Walmart to Macy’s to Home Depot to Target seems to be falling out of favor. Some of this is surely part of the broader market correction and lingering tariff concerns. But much of it is more than a bit mystifying.

In Nordstrom’s case, I remain bullish. The company is showing signs of maturity and is hardly immune from the competitive pressures brought on by industry over-building and digital disruption. Barring a wholly new and unexpected major growth initiative, the accessible luxury retailer has few new locations to open and already has a very well developed e-commerce and off-price business. Yet they seem to be executing well on most of my 8 Essentials of Remarkable Retail and that bodes well for the future. Let’s take a closer look.

  1. Digitally-enabled. For more than a decade Nordstrom has not only been building out best-in-class e-commerce capabilities (online sales now account for 30% of total company revenues!), but architecting its customer experience to reflect that the majority of physical stores sales start in a digital channel. Nordstrom complements its already excellent in-store customer service by arming many sales associated with tablets or other mobile devices.
  2. Human-centered. Being “customer-centric” sounds good, but most efforts fall short largely because brands do not actually incorporate empathetic design-thinking into just about everything they do. Nordstrom, like their neighbors up the street, are much closer to customer-obsessed than virtually all of their competition.
  3. Harmonized. This is my reframe of the over-used term “omni-channel.” But unlike the way many retailers have approached all things omni, it’s not about being everywhere, it’s showing up remarkably where it matters. And it’s realizing that customers don’t care about channels and it’s all just commerce. The key is to execute a one brand, many channels strategy where discordant notes in the customer experience are rooted out and the major areas of experiential delight are amplified. Nordstrom scores well on all key dimensions here–and has for some time. Nordstrom was a first mover in deploying buy online pick-up in store (BOPIS) and continues to elevate its capabilities by dedicating (and expanding) in-store service desks, among other points of seamless integration.
  4. Personal. With a newly improved loyalty program, private label credit card business and high e-commerce penetration, Nordstrom has a massive amount of customer data to make everything it does more intensely customer relevant. Its targeted marketing efforts are good and getting better and it has identified implementing “personalization at scale” as a strategic priority. Fine-tuning its one-to-one marketing efforts, introducing more customized products and experiences and further leveraging its personal shopping program represent additional upside opportunities.
  5. Mobile. Recognizing that a smart device is an increasingly common (and important) companion in most customers’s shopping journeys, Nordstrom has been building out its capabilities, including acquiring two leading edge tech companies earlier this year. Its increasingly sophisticated and useful app has helped earn the brand a top ratingin 2018 Gartner L2’s Digital IQ rankings.
  6. Connected. While there are opportunities to participate more actively in the sharing economy, Nordstrom’s overall social game is strong, earning it the leading US department store rating from BrandWatch.
  7. Memorable. While its department store brethren are swimming in a sea of sameness, Nordstrom excels on delivering unique and relevant customer service and product. It continues to strengthen its merchandise game by offering a well-curated range of price points across multiple formats. This offering is increasingly differentiated–either because the brands are exclusive to Nordstrom or are in limited distribution. Nordstrom’s plan to up the penetration of “preferred”, “emerging” and “owned” brands strengthens the brand’s uniqueness and should provide improved margin opportunities.
  8. Radical. Nordstrom is not quite Amazon-like in its commitment to a culture of experimentation and willingness to fail forward, but they have placed some pretty big equity bets in fast-growing brands like HauteLook, Bonobos and Trunk Club (whoops), in addition to being one of the first traditional retailers to launch an innovation lab (since absorbed back into the company). They are constantly trying new things online and in-store. Most interesting are their new Local concepts  Unlike some competitors who are trying smaller format stores mostly by editing out products and/or whole categories, Local is a completely re-conceptualized format emphasizing services and convenience. These stores have the potential to be materially additive to market share on a trade-area by trade-area basis.

As mentioned at the outset, Nordstrom is a comparatively mature brand with limited major growth pathways. But to view the company from the lens that is weighing on most “traditional” retailers does not appreciate the degree to which the company has outstanding real estate (~95% of full-line stores are in “A” malls), one of the few materially profitable and superbly-integrated digital businesses, strong customer loyalty and important differentiators in customer service and merchandise offerings. Moreover, most of its out-sized capital investments (including expansion into Canada and NYC) will soon be behind it.

Nordstrom will never have the upside that Amazon (or even TJX) has. But it is one of the best positioned, well-executed retailers on the planet. I don’t expect that to change any time soon.

Maybe it’s time for a little bit more respect?

A version of this story appeared at Forbes, where I am a retail contributor. You can check out more of my posts and follow me here.  

I’m honored to have been named one of the top 5 retail voices on LinkedIn.  Thanks to all of you that continue to follow and share my work.

Strange bedfellows? Legacy retailer and disruptive brand partnerships are on the rise.

As the middle continues to collapse—and many well established retailers struggle to move from boring to remarkable—brands must continually seek new ways to become unique, more intensely relevant and truly memorable. One strategy that seems to be picking up steam involves so-called digitally native brands creating alliances with much larger legacy retail companies. Earlier this month, as just one example, Walgreen’s announced a partnership with fast growing online beauty brand Birchbox. An initial pilot will feature a Birchbox offering in 11 Walgreen stores.

The Walgreen’s and Birchbox deal is only the most recent of many business marriages forged in recent years. Target has been especially forward leaning, expanding its assortments via industry disruptors Casper (mattresses), Quip (ultrasonic toothbrushes) and Harry’s (razorblades), among more than a half dozen others. Nordstrom has been active as well, having added (and invested in) Bonobo’s (menswear) way back in 2012. More recently, it has augmented its offering with Reformation (women’s clothing) and Allbirds (shoes). Earlier this year Macy’s invested in and expanded the number of stores featuring b8ta’s store-within-a store concept and Blue Apron began testing distribution through Costco.

I first came to understand the potential power of these alliances when I worked on Sears’ 2002 acquisition of Lands’ End. While the roll-out of Lands’ End products at Sears was horribly botched (and hindered by Sears’ bigger problems), the strategic motivations are easy to grasp. For Sears, struggling to offer powerfully customer relevant brands that weren’t widely distributed at competing retailers, Land’s End held the promise of providing product differentiation, an image upgrade and acquiring new apparel shoppers. For Lands’ End, gaining access to hundreds of Sears stores provided substantially broadened customer reach, lower customer acquisition cost and improved product return rates. Importantly, Lands’ End management knew the biggest barrier to growing its customer base was making it easy for potential customers to experience the product in person—something only physical stores could help deliver. The Sears deal addressed this issue rapidly and at dramatically lower incremental capital investment.

More than 15 years later, the rationale for retailers with a large brick-and-mortar footprint and newer D2C brands to hook up is only stronger. In a world where consumers have nearly infinite product choices and it’s quite easy to shop on the basis of price, it’s never been more important for retailers to differentiate their assortments. Private brands (not “labels”) are one critically important element. Exclusive (or narrowly) distributed products is the other. Not only do these alliances present brands that are largely unique at retail, they can help boost a legacy brand’s overall image, attract new customers and drive incremental traffic.

For many fast-growing digitally native brands the appeal of such partnerships is compelling as well. While many of these brands are opening their own stores, some have used these partnership to test the waters prior to embarking on their own brick-and-mortar strategy. Some use wholesale distribution to drive incremental business in markets where their own stores won’t work. Others (Quip and Harry’s are prime examples) can expand their consumer reach when an owned store strategy simply won’t make sense given their particularly narrow products lines. The opportunity to dramatically expand customer awareness and trial with very little incremental marketing or capital investment is especially attractive.

Of course traditional retail and digitally native brands alike must be quite intentional about how strategic alliances advance their long-term goals. Yet done for the right reason and executed well, these partnerships can address real pain points for each and help accelerate growth. As Amazon continues to gobble up market share—and more and more tools are introduced to help consumers compare product features and prices from any and all retailers—retail brands will face increasing pressure to find meaningful and memorable points of differentiation. And, as the broader market is finally starting to accept, few disruptive direct-to-consumer brands can scale profitability without a material brick-and-mortar presence.

Seen in this light, the rise in these partnership is far from strange. Indeed, they often are quite logical. Which is why we are likely to see quite a few more in the very near future.

A version of this story appeared at Forbes, where I am a retail contributor. You can check out more of my posts and follow me here.  

November 8th I’ll kick of the eRetailerSummit in Chicago. For more info on my speaking and workshops go here. 

Nordstrom ups the ante with new loyalty program

Last week Nordstrom, the U.S.-based fashion retailer, announced the launch of a new loyalty program. Despite its rather uninspired name, The Nordy Club is intended to broaden customer engagement while increasing earn rates by 50% for members paying with a Nordstrom credit card. The new program also offers more access to services and personalized offerings.

At first blush, Nordstrom seems to be emulating what brands as diverse as Neiman Marcus (Note: I worked on the InCircle redesign some 10 years ago), StarbucksUlta and others have long recognized. First, an engaging rewards program is a foundational element for gathering data and leveraging customer insight. Second, programs that have what amounts to a cash-back feature—as many do when they rely on gift cards as primary redemption vehicles—can often provide discounts more cost effectively than one-size-fits-all promotions. Third, reward points create a currency for highly targeted offers to drive specific desired outcomes for the retailer. Fourth, through the use of well designed tiers, the best loyalty programs provide “stretch” incentives that encourage customers to spend more to earn higher rewards and obtain access to unique services and experiences.

At their core, the best in breed reward programs focus on two components. First is transactional loyalty. Here the brand is simply providing a tangible value exchange for increased shopping behavior (and better access to customer data). Calling this “loyalty” is a bit misleading, as this is more akin to bribery. While this program feature incentivizes customers to increase their spending, many customers will respond because they are essentially leaving money on the table if they don’t. The more strategic program designs recognize that true loyalty is an emotion.  In this case leading programs typically use accelerated point accumulation and more experiential offerings to further engender a deeper connection to the brand. This typically includes preferential access to merchandise and events and special or enhanced services (free alterations, valet parking, etc). In this regard, Nordstrom isn’t breaking any new ground.

What does appear to be more on the leading edge, however, is how Nordstrom is leaning into at least 4 of what I call the “8 Essentials of Remarkable Retail.” And this provides the potential for meaningful competitive advantage if done right.

Harmonized. This is the idea that, regardless of how and where the customer chooses to shop, retailers must eliminate points of friction in the customer journey and deliver experiential elements that amplify relevance. In the press release, Nordstrom VP Dave Sims said “when thinking about this evolution, a guiding principle was to offer something for everyone, no matter…where they interact with us.”

Mobile. Many retailers have come to realize that customers no longer go online—they live online and their smart device is often a constant companion in the shopping journey. The new Nordy Club app looks set up to be a core component of how members will engage with the brand.

Personal. As I talk about in my current keynote, no customer wants to be average. More importantly, no customer has to be, given how the power has shifted to them. Making personalization a key aspect of the new rewards program is very responsive to what consumers want and what smart retailers need to do to be more relevant and unique.

Memorable. Today’s consumer is deluged with a tsunami of information and choices. To be the signal amidst all the noise, to truly command meaningful attention, all brands are challenged to become more unique, more relevant and more remarkable. A key way to do that is to create memorable experiences. It’s a bit difficult to ascertain at this point how truly unique some of the benefits will be for elite members (particularly since many of these will never be advertised), but I’m willing to bet that this program dimension will be dialed up substantially.

Of course it remains to be seen how well this new effort will work when fully deployed. Clearly Nordstrom is adding considerable cost to the program. Whether this turns out to generate a good ROI will take years to assess. Moreover, some aspects of what was just announced just bring the company to competitive parity and therefore can be viewed as largely defensive. Others may risk setting off a rewards point war. If that happens, that is a battle that customers win and investors lose.

More interesting for the long-term is how Nordstrom will evolve the harmonized, mobile, personal and memorable pieces of the program and how those will authentically resonate with the others aspects of the branded customer experience for which Nordstrom is justly well regarded. Here, much as they have done over the years staying on the leading edge of digital commerce and executing a well integrated “omnichannel” experience, Nordstrom does seem to be upping the ante and leading the way. How (or if) the competition responds will be the next thing to keep an eye on.

Note: For a far more comprehensive and insightful look at loyalty, I heartily recommend my fellow Forbes Contributor Bryan Pearson’s book The Loyalty Leap.

A version of this story appeared at Forbes, where I am a retail contributor. You can check out more of my posts and follow me here.  

Over the next few weeks I’ll be in Austin, Chicago (twice!), Dallas, Toronto and San Antonio delivering an updated version of my keynote “A Really Bad Time To Be Boring.” For more info on my speaking and workshops go here. And stayed tuned for announcements on early 2019 speaking gigs and my new book.