Growth · Retail · Store closings

Shrinking To Prosperity: Can Store Closings Save Struggling Retailers?

It seems as if major store closing announcements are becoming a nearly daily occurrence. Earlier this week Michael Kors, the once high flying accessible luxury brand, announced it would close at least 100 stores over the next two years. They now join the ranks of Payless Shoes, Macy’s, JC Penney and a host of other major players that have recently decided to shutter a significant percentage of their store fleet.

In fact, some retailers are closing all of their stores hoping to thrive as an online only retailer. Bebe, Guess, Wet Seal and The Limited have all chosen to go this route–and it seems like both Sears and Radio Shack are headed there as well; they just haven’t made it official. In any event, if you want follow the action along at home my friends at Fung Global Retail maintain a store closing tracker.

While its clear that more and more struggling retailers are embracing a strategy to get much smaller, this ultimately begs the question whether it’s really possible to shrink your way to greatness.

Take a moment to make a list of brands (don’t worry, I’ll wait) that have intentionally walked away from a significant percentage of their revenue and been successful over the long-term. I’m not talking about conglomerates that have jettisoned under-performers in their portfolio or companies that have exited specific lines of business with challenging profitability. I’m talking about brands that have willingly stopped doing business in major geographies and/or with large numbers of core customers. It’s not easy it?

The truth is that it is far easier to name brands that closed stores merely as an intermediate step on their way to oblivion. Think Blockbuster and Borders (or Bradlee’s for you old timers). And that’s just the B’s. The retail graveyard is chock-a-block with once mighty merchants that spent years closing stores only to eventually succumb to the inevitable.

I have maintained for some time that when retailers start to close a lot of stores the issue is rarely that they have fundamentally too many outlets. Rather it’s that their value proposition is not sufficiently relevant and remarkable for the locations they have. We know that the notion that physical retail is dead is just silly. We know that plenty of “traditional” retailers are opening stores. Ulta, Sephora, Dollar General, Costco come readily to mind. We know that the hottest brands in retail–from giants like Amazon to specialty players like Warby Parker and Bonobo’s– are opening stores. We know that in most cases the economics of physical stores are superior to e-commerce. We know that the combination of digital AND physical is most often what customers want and what yields the best results. We know that it is virtually always the case that when retailers close stores their e-commerce revenues in the vacated trade area go down.

Clearly, on balance, there are too many stores. And for most retailers the size, configuration, operations and many fundamental aspects of the in-store experience must be changed, in some cases radically. Often the “need” to close stores is borne of desperation, propelled by multiple years of management neglect and failure to innovate. Often, as a practical matter, there is no choice, because there is no way to make up for the sins of the past in the here and now. While I cannot definitively say that mass store closings indicate the beginning of a downward spiral, I would definitely reject that notion that they are a panacea. And we absolutely shouldn’t conclude that such moves suggest a sustainable long-term strategy.

Over three years ago I posited that retailers were delusional if they thought that store closings would be their salvation. Today, as the pace of these closings accelerate, I still fundamentally reject the notion that more than a handful of brands can shrink their way to greatness. I hope I’m wrong.

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A version of this story recently appeared at Forbes, where I am a retail contributor. You can check out more of my posts and follow me here.

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