Being Remarkable · Retail

The two sides of ‘good enough’

It can be quite dangerous to believe that you are better than the competition when the customer evaluates your product offering in isolation and out of context. When I was at Sears our research regularly told us that our target consumers viewed us as the best provider of appliances and tools. Yet we continued to leak market share.

As it turns out, once customers checked out the appliance or tool offering at Home Depot and Lowes they learned that, while the product assortment wasn’t quite as good as ours, the prices were often better. And if they were doing a DIY home improvement project they could get everything they needed in one trip. Plus, having to jump back in the car and deal with the hassle of shopping in the mall added to the “cost” of buying from us. For many customers, at the moment of truth, Home Depot and Lowes were good enough.

The opposite side of good enough involves brands that managed to thrive for many years despite their mediocrity, despite their peddling rather average products for average people.

When consumers had few alternatives, little access to information about their options and weren’t all that demanding, they had little choice but to settle. Those days are rapidly disappearing. Today, in most instances, folks are faced with a virtually infinite amount of choice, information and access. This reality lays bear the deficiencies of any brand for all to see.

Good enough no longer is.

 

One thought on “The two sides of ‘good enough’

  1. I had a similar experience. I worked at Lumberjack, which at the time was one of the go to places for lumber, hardware and tools. The same thing happened which Lowes, Home Depot and the now gone Home Base came in. Our store was much more personable but these larger, price/bulk focused stores wiped us out.

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