Being Remarkable · Customer Insight · Share of attention

You picked a really bad time to be stupid

Last year I wrote a post entitled You picked a really bad time to be boring, the fundamental premise of which was that in a slow growth, highly competitive, ever noisier world, for our marketing to get noticed–much less acted upon–we had better go beyond average. We need to be truly remarkable.

Now I will admit remarkable is easier said than done. But can’t we agree that there is no reason to be stupid, ignorant, unaware or down right lazy with our marketing? Simply no excuse anymore for one-size-fits-all?

The fact is when a brand treats customers as part of an undifferentiated mass, they quickly lose interest. When we fail to demonstrate basic relevance we have little or no chance to command what is increasingly marketing’s limiting factor: customer attention.

Last week I got a voicemail from a sales person at a local car dealership. His pitch went like this: “Hi this is Dave from (car brand I have no interest in) in (town some 30 miles from me) and I was going through the White Pages (huh?) and came across your name and I thought you might be interested in the great deals we have this weekend on (names type of vehicle I also have no interest in). So give me a call when you get a chance.”

It would, of course, be easy to dismiss this as the misguided tactic of some mom & pop, largely clueless business owner who has found some poor sap to work on commission in the hopes of a hit or two. But this form of batch, blast and hope marketing remains common among many larger, more “sophisticated” brands.

As an example, I recently got an email from a luxury retailer that I may or may not have worked for in the past. The hook was this: “As one of our best customers, save an extra xx%…” Really? I have bought absolutely nothing from you in over 5 years and I’m one of your best customers? This brand–which is the same one that has sent me emails encouraging me to redeem my non-existent rewards points–possesses the data to know what my shopping behavior is and therefore could take a totally different, and presumably more effective, targeting strategy.

When brands make little or no effort to know us, show us they know us and show us they value us, our interest wanes. And it’s rarely long before a brand’s share of our attention starts to drop. In my experience, attention, once lost, is very hard to win back.

 

 

2 thoughts on “You picked a really bad time to be stupid

  1. Very sound advice, Steve. I literally throw away piles of direct mail catalogues every day from brands that could learn from your perspective here. What a waste of spend and effort, not to mention the paper they are printed on.

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