Customer Growth Strategy · Customer Insight

The easy prey

In most endeavors it’s a good idea to start with the easiest sale. Get the quick win. Gain some traction. Build a base. Rinse and repeat.

Organizations with any chance of staying around all have easy prey. The easy prey need the least convincing. The easy prey likes just about everything we do. They buy more often and more broadly. They’re typically the least price sensitive and provide the strongest word of mouth.

The tendency in established organizations is to rely on the easy prey too much, to go back to the well too many times. When I was at Neiman Marcus, our easy prey were the super wealthy who were intensely interested in the latest fashion. We raised our prices 8-10% per year and they kept buying. They loved the ridiculously expensive and exotic redemption opportunities in our InCircle Rewards program. We offered ever more exclusive merchandise and events and they cried “more, more, more!”

Unfortunately, the majority of our profits came from folks that weren’t in this elite segment, and our over-reliance on the best of the best started to chase them away (you’re welcome Nordstrom). When the recession came we were hit unnecessarily and devastatingly hard by the lack of balance in our customer portfolio.

For newer, rapidly growing brands, the typical mistake is to optimistically project that early success will readily scale. Many hot e-commerce brands are classic examples. These start-ups hyper-focus on a particular demographic and product-niche and use the advantages of the internet to quickly and cost effectively acquire an initial batch of customers. The metrics for the easy prey are impressive and venture capital dollars follow. Alas, the dynamics that worked so well for the easy prey become quite different (and challenging) as the business scales.

The next tranche of customers don’t get the value proposition as readily as the easy prey. They are harder to convert, requiring more expensive marketing and more costly incentives. Some may like the offering in concept, but want to see, touch and try on the product to be certain they wish to buy it. Acquisition costs go up and physical retail stores are often needed to scale the business to the next level. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but it is a big change and fundamentally alters the nature of how the business operates and makes money.

All brands of any size are composed of multiple customer segments, each with somewhat different needs, values, emotions and behaviors. Some are easier to acquire, grow and retain than others. Some aren’t worth the effort. A well crafted growth strategy is rooted in a solid understanding of each segment and employs a targeted and balanced portfolio approach to maximizing customer value. It necessarily involves moving beyond the easy sale and moving outside of our comfort zone.

I suppose it’s human nature to choose the path of least resistance. Ironically, it’s when we get stuck in what is easy that suddenly things get very, very hard.

Leave a Reply