Customer Insight · Frictionless commerce · Omni-channel

At the intersection of choice and friction

As retail consumers, let’s stop and think about the choices we had a decade or so ago.

With few exceptions, almost all products were purchased from a physical store during limited store hours. For the most part, we selected from what was in-stock; custom orders were generally time-consuming and expensive. If we wanted to shop for alternatives we had to get in our car, walk to another store in the mall or, if we lived in a small town, drive many miles to explore the competition. It was pretty much the same drill if we wanted to check prices. Product reviews came from neighbors and friends, if we were lucky, or from sales people, if we weren’t.

Until fairly recently, many of our shopping experiences were laden with friction, primarily driven by scarcity of choice. Sometimes we had decent alternatives. Many times we did not. Often we had to settle for good enough.

Today, if anything, we are overwhelmed by choices. At a macro-level, consumers are experiencing less and less friction all the time as selection expands, prices decline, access becomes easier and information is abundant. Technology is enabling retailers to root out the so-called pain points in the customer experience. Fierce competition is unlocking more and more value for consumers.

But for many retail brands, this can be quite problematic. Mediocrity in the customer experience is now laid bare. Uncompetitive pricing, stale merchandise, out-of-stocks, long call-center hold times and the like, have gone from mere customer annoyances to the reasons customers are bailing in droves to the competition.

It amazes me that so few retailers truly understand what drives customer loyalty and how they stack up against the evolving competition.

It stuns me that so many brands remain clueless about the sources of friction in the shopping experience, particularly among their most profitable customers.

Blather on all you want about omni-channel this and omni-channel that. But if you don’t really understand what’s going on for your customers at the intersection of choice and friction, chances are you’re wasting your time.

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