Don’t you know who I am?

It’s one thing to expect special treatment, to have all sorts of extras heaped upon us by virtue of some earned status.

Good marketers take care to sort out who their best customers are and then focus on treating them differently in the quest for greater retention and brand advocacy. When we’re not recognized–and then somehow rewarded–for our loyalty, we feel slighted. However, unless the trust was egregiously broken, because of a strong relationship, we’re likely to give the brand another chance.

Bad marketers rely too heavily on one-size-fits-all strategies. They favor the easy over the good. They never make it along the “know me, show me you know me, show me you value me” continuum, because they fail at the very first step.

Yesterday I got an email from Pottery Barn Kids offering me a 15% discount for an online purchase. Now I haven’t bought anything from the Pottery Barn brands in a very long time. But, given my recent divorce and move, I have bought a fair amount from their sister brands (Williams-Sonoma, WS Home and West Elm).

Ignoring that it’s fairly easy to enhance my customer profile with externally purchased data, they should already know quite a bit about me, my shopping behavior and propensities. And I can assure you that absolutely nothing suggests that I would be a good prospect for this offer. In fact, my kids are 17 and 21.

If the marketers at Williams-Sonoma aren’t sharing data across the brands, they need to. If the folks at Pottery Barn used any kind of model, it’s deeply flawed. Either way, they just blew it.

Like most of us, I don’t need my mailbox filled up with irrelevant offers. For brands without any real degree of loyalty it’s far too easy to become victims of the “unsubscribe” button.

In the growing battle for share of attention, when you don’t show me that you know who I am, any little bit of permission you might have had is likely to evaporate. And chances are that permission lost, is permission never to be re-gained.

 

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