Brand Marketing · Customer Experiece · Winning on Experience

How about we start with ‘I’m sorry’?

During the last few weeks, I’ve had far more than my fair share of incredibly frustrating customer service issues to work though. I’ve also encountered quite a few dangerous–or at least annoying–driving situations. Whether caused by global warming, sun spots or, more likely, the universe simply balancing out my karma account, it’s led me to a few observations and conclusions.

In the case of the customer experience snafus, all four companies made stupid errors, some certainly more egregious than others. In all cases, it took quite a bit of time and back and forth–on the phone or via email–to get things straightened out.

Now I get that mistakes happen. I get that, in the big picture, these issues are comparatively minor (feel free to add #FirstWorldProblems if you retweet this). And having led customer service teams myself, I also get that–contrary to retail mythology–the customer isn’t always right. Nevertheless, in the scheme of my multi-year engagement with these companies, these were major fails that had the potential to diminish or destroy my relationship with the brand.

Ultimately, in all cases, the matters got resolved to my satisfaction. Yet how these interactions left me feeling about these brands is markedly different.

Based upon my horrendous experience, I will never do business with one company again. Two of the others, in the end, finally did the right thing. But it was way too hard and took way too long. Now I question whether they really value my business, despite my being a pretty significant, profitable customer. They’ve got plenty of good competition, so when my agreement is up I’m going to be shopping around. The fourth, I’m more or less locked into for a bit, but one of their employees really stepped up and solved a complicated issue.

So what made the difference?

Only 1 of the 4 said “we’re sorry.” When it’s obvious you screwed up, you need to take responsibility. Right away.

Only 1 of the 4 acknowledged how frustrating my experience was. Want to connect with customers? Demonstrate empathy.

Only 1 of the 4 really took on the problem. In all four cases it was immediately clear that the issue was on the company’s end. Yet 3 of the 4 tried to shift blame –and the work of figuring it out–back to me. When you become the customer’s trusted agent, you win.

Only 1 of the 4 had one person who stepped up to drive the matter–in all of its complexity–to resolution (way to go Megan at Cigna!). Own the customer’s problem completely and you have a better chance of owning the relationship.

Which brings me to my recent driving experiences. In one case, someone rolled through a stop sign. Had I not taken evasive action, I would have T-boned them going at least 30 mph. The other day, someone was darting in and out of the traffic going at least 70 and nearly collided with me. Yesterday, someone texting (on the Expressway, doing about 60!) started to drift into my lane, coming within inches of hitting me before they corrected their trajectory.

In all cases, I leaned on the horn; not in a rageful way, but definitely loudly and with a sense of urgency because, hey, high-speed collisions just ain’t my thing. In all cases, I got the same response. They gave me the finger. You know, the one Johnny Manziel likes so much.

Maybe I’m old-fashioned, but it seems to me that whether it’s dealing with customer service issues, engaging in basic human interaction or dealing with loved ones, if we’ve made a mistake–even if we’re embarrassed by our behavior and feel protected by the mothership brand or five thousand pounds of metal–the appropriate response is “I”m sorry.” And the sooner we say it, the better.

Nobody likes a victim. And, in my experience, a little contrition goes a long way, even in the most challenging of circumstances.

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