Being Remarkable · Branding · Retail · Winning on Experience

The big stall and your angle of attack

Many brands, particularly in retail, seem stuck in a persistent malaise. Earnings report after earning report detail tepid sales and mostly flat-lined profits. The accompanying press releases describe the consumer as “on the side-lines.” Others opine that shoppers have adopted a wait-and-see attitude toward spending. The CEO of The Container Store recently concluded that we are experiencing a “retail funk.”

I freely admit I don’t know a lot about aerodynamics. But what I do remember about why planes stall mainly has to do with their speed and the “angle of attack” of the wings. The reasons we are seeing a big stall in retail are similar.

The lack of speed comes from little to no growth in discretionary income. Combine that with a consumer wariness toward spending after a brutal recession–and an uneven recovery–and we have little forward thrust. There is little reason to believe that this will change markedly anytime soon. And, of course, no brand can do anything to change these macro-economic factors.

The angle of attack is how you approach the market–and this is entirely within your control. Confronted with a lack of acceleration you can choose to follow the herd, taking a one-size fits all approach, making average products for average people, engaging in a race-to-the-bottom price war and so forth. Best case: you hold your ground and your results are in line with your industry segment–which is to say strikingly mediocre. Worst case: inadequate speed and an insufficient angle of attack cause you to plunge to the ground. Not very appealing.

Perhaps you’ve noticed that even in the worst of times there are still some clear winners. Perhaps you’ve noticed that somehow, even when the stock market goes through its gyrations or consumer confidence wanes or weather conditions are not conducive to seasonal apparel sales, somehow or other, a few brands manage to shine.

Maybe these brands are less concerned with the speed of the market and more focused on their angle or attack?

Maybe if you are losing lift, you might want to stop doing the same things over and over that got you there in the first place?

 

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