Being Remarkable · Customer-centric · Winning on Experience

Customer service: Are you a ninja or a nincompoop?

Having divorced and moved earlier this year, I’ve had quite a few occasions to interact with companies’ customer service functions. In most cases, I’ve merely been updating my personal information. In others, my request was a bit more complicated. I’ve also bought a fair amount of new stuff, so I’ve had to deal with delivery issues and the like.

Most requests have gone smoothly. A handful were remarkable. Others were noteworthy for their sheer incompetence.

Addressing customers’ problems can be the proverbial moment of truth for a brand. The commitment to owning the customer’s issue can truly illuminate the difference between those that view customer service as a necessary evil and those that understand it as a key competitive advantage. Reflecting on my recent experiences, I’ve come up with a few simple guidelines to separate the ninjas from the nincompoops.

Seek first to understand. Before you shoot off the canned response or solve a problem I’m not having, make sure you actually know what my desired outcome is. I’m still trying to get an account issue resolved with a major upscale home furnishings retailer–I won’t say their name, but it rhymes with Festoration Lardware–because their CSR’s keep suggesting fixes to a problem that’s different then the one I’m experiencing.

Start where we left off. If I’m already into my third conversation or umpteenth email, don’t make me start all over again with my story. Pay attention to the chain of interactions.

Respect my communication requests. If I say I prefer to be contacted by email, don’t call me. Seems simple, but two companies specifically asked for my preference and then promptly ignored it.

Do what you said you we’re going to do. The folks at Regus told me they’d get back to me in 1 or 2 business days. 3 weeks later I’m still waiting. And they haven’t responded to my follow-up requests.

Anticipate. You can merely do what the customer requested, or you can act as an advocate or trusted agent and look at the bigger picture. I asked Hilton to update my account information and reset my password. They handled that request very efficiently but also noticed that I had not gotten credit for a recent stay. So they went ahead and took care of that without my asking. Nice.

Add a dose of wow. Offer to waive a delivery charge because I’ve made multiple purchases? Upgrade my shipment to next day delivery? Expedite my order because I’ve had a problem? Yes, please.

Avoid ironic messages. “Your call is really important to us.” Really?  Then why am I in a 10 minute queue?

Treat different customers differently. Yes, every customer deserves good and respectful service, but some needs must be prioritized above others. If you know–or can reasonably surmise–that some customers have greater lifetime value and/or significant brand influence potential–you might want to show a bit more care and attention.

It’s worth remembering that every customer interaction with your organization is an opportunity to enhance or detract from your brand’s value. Every interaction has the potential to increase the odds of positive word-of-mouth or turn someone into a detractor–and, worst case, a vocal and influential one.

You don’t have to call your customer service staff ninjas to get this right, though maybe that helps. Mostly, you just have to care.

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