Brand Marketing · Customer Growth Strategy · Customer-centric · Multi-channel · Omni-channel

Omni-channel: Fix it in the mix

I’m just back from the intimate little affair known as the National Retail Federation’s “Big Show.” Of course if you’ve ever been, you know that it is, in fact, far from intimate. The multi-day extravaganza in New York’s Javits–from the Hebrew, meaning “non-existent mobile connectivity”–Center features thousands of attendees, hundreds of exhibitors and buzz-words aplenty.

In many sessions, barely a minute could go by without a speaker uttering “omni-channel” this or “omni-channel” that. Yet the attentive listener would quickly conclude that not only was there often more heat emitted than light shed, there was also a fair amount of out-and-out hooey and semantic mumbo-jumbo.

Let’s get a few things straight, shall we?

First, omni-channel is no different from what many leading retailers have been investing in for years: the vision of a customer-centric, anytime, anywhere, anyway, seamless experience across channels and touch-points. Call it “channel-agnosticity”, “frictionless commerce” or “multi-channel integration”, it’s all more or less the same. Customers don’t care what you call it, they care what you do with it.

Second, the point is not to simply add more channels. The “omni” part of “omni-channel” is about being intensely relevant in all the channels your customers care about and making the experience frictionless for her as goes through her decision journey. I heard one executive say they were the best omni-channel retailer because they sold in more channels than anyone else. That’s very misguided thinking.

Third, participating in, or being pretty good within, all the channels that your customers employ is not enough, nor is having a decent experience across all channels for your average customer.

Winning in omni-channel is all about the mix. The mix of customers you serve. The mix of products and services you offer. The mix of media employed to drive engagement and loyalty. The mix of channels where consumers can learn and transact. And so on.

To be sure, there are some foundational ingredients of winning in this evolving omni-channel world. Possessing a single view of the customer and the ability to uniquely identify, track and reach individual customers regardless of where and how they engage with you is critical. Without breaking down organizational silos (and the culture, incentives and metrics associated with them) you won’t get very far on your transformation. Making your entire brand’s inventory available to the customer at all points of sale (supported by easy, channel of choice returns) is rapidly becoming the price of entry.

Yet without the capabilities and commitment to treat different customer differently, your omni-channel strategy risks being an also-ran.

Many of the NRF’s Big Show presenters and vendors were pushing ingredients. Ingredients are essential, as is a good recipe. But the customer wants the finished product. And it’s the mix, that perfect blend, that really makes something special.

Fix it in the mix.

Leave a Reply