I love the way you lie

Whether you stumbled upon Richard Chang’s excellent article “Outlets may not be the bargain you think“–or happen to remember my post from 3 years ago entitled “Faux clearance: Do outlet customers really care”–you may already know that the vast majority of merchandise sold through outlet and off-price channels is made specifically for those stores. Moreover, most of the purported discounts are entirely made up.

With few exceptions, much of the product sold through “regular” channels–department stores, specialty stores, e-commerce–is sold at a discount, and often a substantial one. Open today’s newspaper, or go on-line, and you will see tons of product discounted 20-50%. If you are a Joseph A. Bank customer you can often get a “Buy 1, Get 2 Free” deal. Take advantage of an additional savings coupon, or use your store credit card at many retailers, and you’re likely to reap at least another 10% discount.

While, arguably, we have seen an uptick in promotional intensity in recent years, the notion of marking something up to be able to then claim big savings has been a core component of most brands’ playbooks for at least as long as I’ve been in retail–and that’s over 20 years. For many retailers, the concept of “regular” price is purely fictional.

An essential part of Ron Johnson’s attempt at transforming JC Penney was the concept of every day, “fair and square” pricing. Surely–his left brain must have told him–customers would understand that $40 every day is better than $60 some days and $40 only on the days we happened to be running a sale. No more smoke and mirrors! No more waiting for a sale! No more wasted costs on advertising and store expenses to manage this expensive con job!

Well, we all know how that turned out.

My hope is that brands will be far more transparent in their pricing and discounting strategy. But barring legislative action, my experience tells me that holding my breath for this wish will only turn my face blue.

Whether it’s out of customer ignorance or some weird twist in evolutionary biology, the reality is we’re all part of a grand delusion.

We love the way you lie. And more, apparently, is better.

 

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