Let’s get digital…digital

The first wave of digital retail was either about brands with a history in catalog merchandising putting up a basic e-commerce site (Williams-Sonoma, Lands’ End) or pure-plays picking off products categories that early adopters could readily embrace (Amazon). The market dealt harshly with models that could not execute a basic direct-to-consumer formula, targeted a product category that wasn’t ready for digital prime time (RIP pets.com) or a combination of both.

As consumers became more comfortable with buying on-line–and retailers got better at deploying new technologies–other categories made sense for pure-plays (Blue Nile, Zappos) and traditional retailers ramped up their multiple channel strategies. For most, this second wave was largely a silo-ed approach with the e-commerce and the bricks and mortar divisions pursuing related, but mainly independent, strategies.

In the most recent third wave, a few retailers (I’m looking at you Nordstrom) understood that most of their customers were interacting with their brand across multiple channels and touch-points. They accepted that brand trumps channel, that digital was transforming their business forever. They declared that silos belong on farms and began investing in a more integrated, customer-centric experience, leading with digital more often than not.

In the next wave, the blended channel is the only channel. The distinctions between devices, channels, touch-points and media begin to blur. Differences with little distinction. Or differences that lead to extinction if your core value proposition can be delivered better, cheaper, faster digitally.

Clearly not every product category is going completely digital. Groceries looks pretty safe. Cars too.

But failure to understand how digital transforms the customer discovery, engagement, purchasing, retention and advocacy process is a prescription for your brand’s demise.

So let’s get digital. Let me hear your actions talk.

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