Learning to surf

There are a few different ways people approach the ocean.

Some dive right in.

Others inch in slowly, testing the temperature of the water until they feel comfortable to wade in all the way.

A few like to stand there and get pummeled by the water’s force.

And of course there are those that avoid going to the beach entirely.

The most daring and remarkable of all are the surfers.

The surfer harnesses the ocean’s power, gliding above the surface, zigzagging their way to the shore. Of course, sometimes they fall off their board. But the good ones understand this is just part of the process and hop right back on. They know that through practice they will navigate the inevitable ebbs and flows, the unexpected surge, the occasional fellow competitor that gets too close. Over time, they spend more time up on the board, reaching the shore faster with far more grace and power then when they started.

They understand and accept a few things we all should.

Avoiding turbulent water is impossible.

Fighting the power of the ocean is an exercise in futility.

Waves are inevitable.

We’re going to have to learn how to surf.

HT to Jack Kornfield for the inspiration

You know what’s hard?

Customers say they want a more seamless experience across all channels and touch-points. “Sure” you say, “but it’s very expensive and complicated to implement that level of integration.”

Silo-ed data, systems, organizations and metrics are keeping your brand from being more customer-centric and relevant. “I know” is your response, “but greater centralization would be very jarring to our culture.”

In an increasingly noisy world, mass marketing and one-size-fits-all approaches fail to gain share of attention, becoming less effective by the day. You respond, “you’re right, but treating different customers differently is difficult to scale.”

Relentless price promotions and layering of discounts and reward points deteriorate profit margins, teach customers to only buy on sale and accelerate an inevitable race to the bottom. Your defense is to say “well that’s what moves the top line” and to point out how hard it is to justify full price.

In the inevitable battle between denial, defending the status quo and rationalization vs. acceptance, leaping and innovation, we tend to choose the former. And our fate is sealed.

Many of the things we avoid as too risky are, in fact, often just the opposite. The risk is in the failure to change, in the lack of passion to become intensely relevant, in being stuck in “me too” instead of choosing to become remarkably different.

What’s hard is to move where the customer is headed after the competition has already established a beach head.

What’s hard is to break through the clutter with undifferentiated products and tired messaging.

What’s hard is to acquire, grow and retain the right customers with average products for average people.

What’s hard is to catch up when you’ve fallen behind.

Mass or built for me?

All about price, or all about unique value?

Average or remarkable?

My guess is that every brand that’s gone through the work of closing stores, firing people and liquidating inventory might have a different view of what’s hard.

Why go to the store?

There are some who think that most brick & mortar stores are eventually going away and that e-commerce can have a compound annual growth rate of 15% until the end of time. To which I answer, “don’t be silly” and “of course not.”

There are many powerful reasons for physical retail locations to exist. In fact, we are already witnessing the limits of pure-play models as online only players are opening more traditional store-fronts (Warby Parker, Bonobos, Amazon and many others). Well established direct-to-consumer brands like LL Bean are doubling down on a commitment to retail store expansion. And even with the explosion of online shopping, close to 95% of transactions still take place in a traditional store.

When you take out products that can be delivered digitally (books, movies, games and the like) in most cases, for most consumers, there is value in being able to go see, try on, or touch the actual product. Having a live conversation with a well-trained sales associate can be extremely helpful. Physical stores offer a social experience that can’t be readily duplicated via the web or smart phone. And, typically, you can take the product with you, rather than having to wait.

Having said this, digitally enabled business models ARE disrupting every category and chipping away at many historical advantages of bricks & mortar. Websites often have better information than in-store sales people. Assortments can be much wider and prices are often sharper. Next day delivery may be either good enough or simply more convenient than having to drive to a mall and deal with the crowds. And we can be certain that future innovation will further eat away at traditional store advantages.

The fact is, in most instances, the future winners will be retailers that blend digital and physical offerings. They will deeply understand customers wants and desires and build a tightly integrated, highly flexible hybrid model rooted in treating different customers differently. That means a transformation, but not the elimination, of physical stores.

By contrast, the losers will be those that blindly adopt all things omni-channel.

The losers will be those traditional retailers that continue to run a bolted on and siloed e-commerce channel.

The losers will be those who fail to see the interplay between digital and physical stores and close too many doors–and turn the remaining ones into boring museums of best-sellers and “me too” products.

The losers will be those who hold on to one-size-fits-all customer and marketing strategies.

Consumers will continue going to stores for many, many years to come. Whether they will come to your store is a different question.

Not quite my tempo

Every individual has a pace at which they prefer to work. Of course it can vary given the circumstances. We can pick up the tempo in a crisis, or slow down when faced with uncertainty. But there is a rhythm that feels most natural to us and, often, folks that consistently work faster or slower than we do can frustrate us.

Organizations are similar. Some are constantly on the balls of their feet, poised for action, working briskly through issues, taking risks, experimenting. When a new opportunity arises, they are ready to pounce. They’re passionate–and in a hurry–to be part of the next big thing.

Others are at the other end of the spectrum. They sit back and observe. They are cautious, timid even, moving deliberately to scope the situation out. They’re more afraid to make a mistake than to fall behind. They constantly need to be pushed into making any meaningful change.

There are problems with going too fast, just as there can be issues with going too slow. This clip from Whiplash brilliantly illustrates that one challenge is knowing and accepting your tempo.

In case you haven’t notice, the pace of innovation is accelerating. Customer expectations are being transformed, seemingly overnight. Whole industries are being disrupted like never before.

Which is why it’s a good time for a tempo check.

And when in doubt, it’s probably better to rush, than drag.

As I sit here in judgment

As I sit here in judgment, I get a little ego boost by putting you down.

As I sit here in judgment, the “facts” conform to a story I’ve already scripted.

As I sit here in judgment, the walls come up, preventing true human connection.

As I sit here in judgment, you’re more object than person. Something to be labeled, rather than seen and felt.

As I sit here in judgment, what’s different is automatically wrong–and fear becomes my blanket.

As I sit here in judgment, I become stuck while others are out there doing the work.

It’s easy to be the critic. It’s pretty hard to get hurt sitting in the stands watching the game. And what’s simpler than feeling better about ourselves by shining a harsh light on all the idiots, charlatans and zealots we’re forced to deal with every day?

There is a time and place for critical thinking, for pushing back and calling out, for standing up for what’s right and just.

But if you are anything like me, more often than not, it’s pure self-righteousness at work, not the pursuit of some higher calling or purpose.

Some customers

One of the more amusing moments of my time at Sears was when our newish CEO insisted that we stop referring to our customers as “him” and instead say “her.” This was meant to underscore the need to reinvigorate our apparel business and identify women as the most frequent decision-makers for our softline categories.

While there was merit to this strategy–and Sears testosterone-driven, male dominated culture absolutely deserved a swift kick in the, uh, pants–it ignored the complexity of Sears myriad businesses and the attendant diverse consumer segments we needed to attract, grow and retain.

Of course, Sears wasn’t alone. It’s common for business leaders and analysts to make global pronouncements about what “she wants” or how “our customer” is responding. While these statements may have an air of profundity, they’re just glib soundbites.

Today there is no everyone. There is no monolithic him or her or them.

Today the idea of being a little bit of everything to everybody is irrelevant. The era of mass is giving way to the era of us.

Today one-size-fits all strategies are running out of gas. We must treat different customers differently.

Today it’s not about “the customer” or any notion of all customers.

It’s about some customers; the right customers, carefully selected, deeply understood and served in unique and remarkable ways.